Fine Art

This month we are featuring photographers who have Fine Art either as their primary focus or as an additional income stream for their photography business. These days, many people are looking for added income, so licensing images either as fine art or as stock can potentially bring you in some extra money. But what makes an image “fine art” – who’s to say?

Historically Fine Art photography began with Pictorialism where photographers attempted to imitate painting styles. In America however, photographers such as Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, reacted and rebelled against that notion and formed Group f/64 who advocated more “straight” photography that did not simply imitate something else. It wasn’t until the twentieth century that both fine art and documentary photography became accepted by the art and gallery worlds.

Interestingly, some years ago I took a photography course at FIT and part of the syllabus required that we write a paper on a particular photographer (which we selected from a hat.) I was assigned Robert Mapplethorpe and as I read, researched and I wrote, I found not only his story to be extremely engaging, but also the evolvement of photography into becoming a valued item. It was Robert Mapplethorpe who persuaded his lover and renowned art curator, Sam Wagstaff to start collecting photography, and as a very influential man amongst the rich and elite both he and Mapplethorpe began a revolutionary trend when previously photography had not exactly been considered “fine” let alone as “collectable” art.

Wikipedia tells us that “fine art photography” refers to photographs that are created to fulfill the creative vision of the artist. But then, in a way, aren’t all photographs? Apparently not, according to them, and I quote, Fine art photography stands in contrast to photojournalism and commercial photography. Photojournalism provides visual support for stories, mainly in the print media. Commercial photography’s main focus is to sell a product or service.” Well yes, photojournalists certainly do “document” events and record our history, but it is their creativity and sensitivity to their subject that allows only them to capture those particular and evocative moments.

And yes, commercial photography is generally used to “sell’ something but we have seen for a while now an increase in “photo documentary” images being used for “commercial advertising” purposes. I recall for example, after Hurricane Katrina there were several documentary photographers who were awarded commercial campaigns based on their gritty, photojournalistic work. And look how “documentary-style” wedding photography has completely revolutionized that whole sector of our industry!

So we see the lines have become more blurred than ever. It is perfectly possible for “commercial” photographers to cross over into the “fine art” world, by publishing books, selling prints and participating in gallery shows. You don’t have to be only one type of photographer – you can have your finger in more than one pie, providing your message is clear. One of my clients decided to detach his “fine art” work from his more commercial “stock photography” and created two separate entities with two different websites. Others of you may choose to have licensing and fine art print information available on your commercial sites. No matter what you photograph or where your images end up – in a magazine, a gallery, a book, a billboard, remember it is all “fine” based on your acquired technique and it is all “art” based on your inherent creativity.

ChatterLog December 2009

Fine Art

This month we are featuring photographers who have Fine Art either as their primary focus or as an additional income stream for their photography business. These days, many people are looking for added income, so licensing images either as fine art or as stock can potentially bring you in some extra money. But what makes an image “fine art” – who’s to say?

Historically Fine Art photography began with Pictorialism where photographers attempted to imitate painting styles. In America however, photographers such as Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, reacted and rebelled against that notion and formed Group f/64 who advocated more “straight” photography that did not simply imitate something else. It wasn’t until the twentieth century that both fine art and documentary photography became accepted by the art and gallery worlds.

Click here to see the full article in my Blog.

ChatterArtists of the Month December 2009

Debbie Miracolo
Debbie Miracolo, whose “teen portrait project” we told you about in the Summer bulletin, will have selected images in a group show called “The Sweet Escape” which opens at the Morean Arts Center in St. Petersburg, Florida this coming January.
For more information about the upcoming exhibition please visit: http://www.moreanartscenter.org/exhibitions/future_exhibits/main.htm

© Debbie Miracolo
http://www.debbiemiracolo.com/

Barry Steven Greff
Then we have Barry Steven Greff, whose series “Flow” will be featured in the forthcoming 2009 Silvershotz International Journal of Fine Art Photography, Portfolio Edition –http://www.silvershotz.com/
Some of these images are also currently on display at the Mason Murer Fine Art Gallery in Atlanta through the end of the year – http://www.masonmurer.com/

Barry has also placed 3rd in the Black and White Magazine “Single Image Competition” with the image below titled “30 Rock.” The winning and honorable mention images are featured in this months issue which can be found in your local Barnes & Noble book store.

© Barry Steven Greff
http://www.barrystevengreff.com/

Steve Brickles
Next we have Steve Brickles who decided to stop and photograph these “Brilliant Trees” that he spotted when driving to a meeting in Oxford, England, earlier this year. These images will now be part of a group show at MV Labs in New York opening in March of next year. So you never know, if you see it, take those few minutes to stop and capture the image that stopped you in the first place.

© Steve Brickles

http://www.brickles.org

Gordon Watkinson
And then we have Gordon Watkinson, whose initial book project “BAUHAUS TWENTY-21: An Ongoing Legacy” has turned into a much larger endeavor. Not only has the book been published in three languages (so far) there is also now a traveling exhibition, which is currently in Europe, as well as workshops with the photographer. His is a great example of how the seed of an idea can grow and blossom into an entire project –http://fotosynthesis.com/

© Gordon Watkinson

http://www.gordonwatkinson.com/

Constance Jackson
And last but not least, we have Constance Jackson, an emerging photographer I worked with a couple of months ago. I was really struck by the beauty and the humor of her “Little Helper” series.

© Constance Jackson

http://www.cjp3.com/

ChatterNews December 2009

Julie Grahame
Check out my friend Julie Grahame’s blog called aCuratorhttp://acurator.com/blog/
It is a great resource for photo news as well as stories from the legendary photographer, Yousuf Karsh’s archive, which Julie represents.

Irving Penn © Yousuf Karsh

Michael Grecco
Southern California photographer Michael Grecco has recently received an award for PDN’s Digital Imaging Contest for a portrait of comedian and best-selling author Chelsea Handler. Michael will also be launching a new website in this coming month so stay tuned!
To view more of Michael’s work please visit: http://www.michaelgrecco.com/


© Michael Grecco

Joe Josephs

Here is a great idea for a holiday gift! Check out my client Joe Josephs’ beautiful Central Park 2010 Calendar which now available online at –
http://www.centralpark.com/store/2010-central-park-calendar.html


Image © Joe Josephs

Chelsea Brewer

I would also like to give a mention to my assistant Chelsea Brewer, who is now based on the West coast but still helps me assemble the ChatterBulletin each month, I couldn’t do it without her. Some of her work will be in an upcoming group show in Oakland, California, the theme of which is “Bewitched.”

ChatterTip of the Month December 2009

Storage and Cleaning of Fresh Vegetables & Herbs

© Adriana Mullen

Did you know that radishes & turnips stay fresh and crisp if you store them in a bowl of cold water (tops removed) in the refrigerator? Certain vegetables however, should not be refrigerated, such as potatoes, onions & squash. They are best stored in a cool, dark area and some people even recommend storing potatoes in a brown paper bag with an apple. Remember we put an apple in a brown paper bag to speed up ripening fruit, yet with potatoes, it apparently prevents spoilage.
Whenever you wash fresh vegetables, such as spinach, cabbage or leeks, first soak them in a sink of salted cold water. The salt will draw out any lingering bugs, earth or sand particles. Larger leaf varieties like lettuce & spinach, or for example green vegetables such as broccoli, beans & snow peas are best if washed first, then patted dry and stored in a plastic bag with a damp paper towel.

One of the best ways to store celery & asparagus and in particular fresh herbs such as basil, cilantro & parsley is to put them in a glass of water, like a bunch of flowers. Cut the stems first and use a tall glass only half-filled with water so that just the stems are submerged. You can also place a plastic bag over the herbal bouquet to prevent wilting.

And a wilted lettuce will apparently revive itself if you soak it in iced water for a few minutes – well who wouldn’t be revived after that?

ChatterRecipe of the Month December 2009

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup


© Mira Zaki

This recipe (courtesy of Ian Garten) suggests pre-roasting the butternut squash, which helps to bring out the sweetness. If you prefer not to do that, then you can just sauté the vegetables in some olive oil first and then cook them in the chicken stock before pureeing the soup. If you are vegetarian, use vegetable instead of chicken stock. Some of you may prefer to omit the apples altogether and just make the soup with the squash and the onions, but you might want to consider using freshly grated apple as a garnish.

3 – 4 lbs Butternut Squash (peeled & seeded)
2 yellow Onions
Apples (preferably McIntosh) (peeled & cored)
3 tablespoons Olive Oil
Salt Pepper
2 – 4 cups Chicken Stock (preferably home-made)
½ teaspoon Curry Powder

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Cut the squash, onions & apples into approximately one-inch cubes. Place them on one (or two) sheet pan(s), toss with olive oil, salt & pepper and roast until very tender for about 35 – 45 minutes, tossing occasionally. When the vegetables are done, you can either puree them in the food processor, or pass through a medium-blade food mill. Add some of the warm chicken stock to help puree the mixture. Place pureed vegetables and apples into a large pot and add enough chicken stock to make a thick consistency. Add the curry powder and season with some more salt & pepper to taste. Suggested garnishes: Freshly grated Apple, or some chopped Scallions. Other suggestions are diced Bananas, flaked & toasted Coconut, roasted & salted Cashews.

ChatterEvents December 2009

Saturday, December 5th, 2009 – 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Art At Bay – Inaugural Show & Reception
Group Show Featuring work by friend and artist Florence Poulain

@ Art At Bay, a cooperative gallery of the Staten Island Creative Community
70 Bay Street (1 block south of S.I. Ferry Terminal)
New York, NY

Gallery Hours for December: Friday’s 6:00pm – 9:00pm; Saturdays and Sundays noon – 6:00pm

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009 – 6:30pm – 9:30pm
ASPP NY Chapter 2009 Holiday Party & The Jane Kinne Picture Professional of the Year Award Presentation to Danita Delimont

@ Danal Restaurant
59 Fifth Avenue (one door south of 13th Street)
New York, NY

Cost: Free for members; $30 in advance for non-members / $60 at the door


© Steve Terrill / Jaynes Gallery
http://www.danitadelimont.com/

For more information please visit: http://www.aspp.com/index.php/chapters/new-york/128-aspp-ny-chapter-holiday-party-a-picture-professional-of-the-year-award-presentation

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009 – 6:00pm – 8:00pm
Paolo Ventura “Winter Stories” Exhibition Reception
Exhibition on display Thursday, December 10th, 2009 thru Saturday, January 23rd, 2010.

@ Hasted Hunt Kraeutler
537 West 24th Street
New York, NY


For more information please visit: http://www.hastedhunt.com/home.php

Thursday, December 10th, 2009 – 6:30pm
ASMP NY Presents: A Talk by Photographer Greg Miller
@ School of Visual Arts, Amphitheater
209 East 23rd Street
New York, NY

Cost: FREE


© Greg Miller
http://www.gregmiller.com

Friday, December 11th, 2009 – 7:00pm – 11:00pm
ASMPNY 2009 Annual Holiday Party & NY Cares Coat Drive
@ Studio 385
385 Broadway, Suite 3F (between White and Walker Streets)
New York, NY

Cost: Free for ASMP members; $20 for non-members; $5 for students; FREE for all of those who bring a coat!




All coats will be donated to NY Cares. For information about this organization please visit:http://www.newyorkcares.org/

Space is limited! To RSVP please visit: https://asmp.org/education/event/register?venue_id=275

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009 – 7:00pm – 9:00pm
NY Monthly Photo Salon
@ SoHo Photo Gallery
15 White Street
New York, NY

Cost: $10 at the door

For more information or questions please contact Rich Pomerantz at rich@richpomerantz.com, Emmanuel Faure at emmanuel@emmanuelfaure.com or Bill Westheimer at bill@billwest.com.

As there are fewer photography events at this time of year I thought I’d give you some fun, interesting and free stuff to see in New York:

The Staten Island Ferry


http://www.siferry.com/


The Staten Island Ferry is run by the City of New York for one pragmatic reason: To transport Staten Islanders to and from Manhattan. Yet, the 5 mile, 25 minute ride also provides a majestic view of New York Harbor and a no-hassle, even romantic, boat ride, for free! One guidebook calls it “One of the world’s greatest (and shortest) water voyages.” The ferry departs from the Battery Park Terminal located in lower Manhattan and operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with the majority of departures between 6am and midnight.

National Museum of the American Indian


http://www.nmai.si.edu/


The National Museum of the American Indian is the 16th museum of the Smithsonian Institution. It is the first national museum dedicated to the preservation, study, and exhibition of the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of Native Americans. The George Gustav Heye Center is located at the historic Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, One Bowling Green, adjacent to the Northeast corner of Battery Park, not far from the Staten Island Ferry, and is open daily from 10am to 5pm, and until 8pm on Thursdays.

The High Line


http://www.thehighline.org/


The High Line was built in the 1930s, as part of a massive public-private infrastructure project called the West Side Improvement. It lifted freight traffic 30 feet in the air, removing dangerous trains from the streets of Manhattan’s largest industrial district. No trains have run on the High Line since 1980. Friends of the High Line, a community-based non-profit group, formed in 1999 when the historic structure was under threat of demolition. The group works in partnership with the City of New York to preserve and maintain the structure as an elevated public park. The park is located on Manhattan’s West Side, currently running from Gansevoort in the meatpacking district to 20th Street and is open from 7am to 10pm daily.

The Forbes Galleries


http://www.forbesgalleries.com/


The Forbes Galleries are a unique treasure trove of collectibles tucked within the lobby of the Forbes Magazine’s headquarters in New York City. Admission is always free to this interesting museum featuring such items as toy soldiers, toy boats, Monopoly games and more. The galleries are located in the heart of Greenwich Village at 
62 Fifth Avenue and 12th Street and are open free to the public from 10am to 4pm on Tuesdays through Saturdays.

This useful link not only gives you details on everyday free deals and discounted admission at New York City museums and attractions but it also lists deals for each day of the week.
http://gonyc.about.com/cs/museums/a/museumdeals.htm

And this link gives you a list of all the Free Tickets for TV Shows taped in New York, such as David Letterman, Rachel Ray and Who Wants to be a Millionaire.
http://www.nytix.com/Links/TV/index.html